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Special Reports

U.S. Counties With the Worst Quality of Life In Every State

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The United States of America boasts the world’s largest economy, valued at US$26 trillion as of November 2023. It’s earned the label  “The Land of Opportunity.” The United States has long been a desirable destination for immigrants seeking a comfortable, abundant, and luxurious life. However, despite being the world’s largest economy, there are areas or counties within its 50 states that have fallen behind in important measures related to overall individual well-being and quality of life.

Indeed, negative indicators have surged in the United States in recent years. These consist of increasing incidences of critical diseases such as liver cirrhosis, chronic liver ailments, heart diseases, and mental health disorders.

Furthermore, the coronavirus, or COVID-19 pandemic tormented the United States from 2020 to 2022, with over 1.1 million Americans losing their lives to the deadly virus. With these realities, CEOWorld Magazine found it opportune to list the counties in the United States that require government and private sector intervention.

These areas have elevated poverty rates, poorly educated people without college degrees, and low life expectancies. The worst US counties to live in per CEOWORLD magazine also have low median annual household incomes and high unemployment incidences.

These are the worst counties to live in every U.S. state:

Alabama: Wilcox County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 27.4% (Alabama: 15.8%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 11% (Alabama: 26.7%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 71.9 years (Alabama: 75.7 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$36,385  (Alabama: US$54,943)
County center: Camden
In Alabama, Wilcox County is the least recommended area to reside. Its high poverty rate of 27.4 percent is attributed to a frail job market. In the past five years, the average unemployment rate in Wilcox County has been 14 percent. This percentage is greater than double the Alabama jobless rate average of 5.4 percent. Being the worst county to live in Alabama, people are discouraged from moving to Wilcox County due to the lack of affordable and healthy lifestyle and healthcare choices. The people’s life expectancy at birth in this low-income area is merely 71.9 years. This number is almost four years below the 75.7-year Alabama state average.

Alaska: Kusilvak Census Area
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 36.6% (Alaska: 10.4%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 2.9% (Alaska: 30.6%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 69.2 years (Alaska: 79.9 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$37,975 (Alaska: US$80,287)
The Kusilvak Census Area is along the southwestern Alaskan coast. CEOWorld Magazine rated it as among the worst locations to live in the United States. After all, the Kusilvak Census Area’s poverty incidence is more than threefold higher than Alaska’s rate. Furthermore, since merely 2.9 percent of the people possess bachelor’s degrees or higher in this county of Alaska, most of them are poor. This percentage is unlike the more than 30 percent of Alaska’s adults who finished college. Most of the Kusilvak Census Area’s people are not financially secure and do not have improved wellness. The residents’ life expectancy is under 70 years, which is a decade lower than Alaska’s average of 79.9 years.

Arizona: Apache County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 33.9% (Arizona: 13.5%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 12.8% (Arizona: 31.2%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 72.4 years (Arizona: 79.5 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$34,788 (Arizona: US$65,913)
County center: St. Johns
In Arizona, Apache County is an area spanning over much of the state’s eastern border. This economically struggling county is not a recommended residential location. After all, employment opportunities are scarce, with an average of 9 percent of the local workforce being out of work in the past five years. Across Arizona, Apache County’s case is well above the 5.6-percent jobless rate and this figure explains the high poverty incidence. Due to employment opportunities’ scarcity and financial difficulties, Apache County’s population has declined by 7.8 percent between 2015 and 2021. This fact is despite Arizona experiencing population growth of 6.6 percent over the same time frame.

Arkansas: Phillips County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 33.3% (Arkansas: 16%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 14.3% (Arkansas: 24.3%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 71.7 years (Arkansas: 76.2 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$32,235  (Arkansas: US$52,123)
County center: Helena
Phillips County, Arkansas is in the state’s Delta region. It used to be a transportation and agricultural center. CEOWorld Magazine discovered that Phillips County has a long history of violence and racial hostilities, making it among the least recommended places in the United States to live in. This Arkansas county’s poverty rate is greater than double the state poverty incidence, following decades of economic deterioration. Moreover, Phillips County has residents with low educational attainment. Merely 14.3 percent of its adults earned bachelor’s degrees, which is lower than 24.3 percent of Arkansans who graduated from college. Since Phillips County is economically unattractive due to the high poverty incidence, its population has steadily declined since 2015 to 17 percent. This reality is despite Arkansas’s population growing by 1.6 percent.

California: Lake County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 16.8% (California: 12.3%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 17.5% (California: 35.3%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 75.1 years (California: 81.5 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$53,399 (California: US$84,097)
County center: Lakeport
California’s Lake County is a landlocked area in Sacramento’s northwest region. Potential residents are dissuaded from moving there because this location struggles with high poverty and unemployment incidences. 16.8 percent of Lake County’s population exists below the poverty line, which is compared to California’s 12.3-percent poverty scale. Additionally, over the past five years, an average of 10.1 percent of Lake County’s workforce did not have jobs. This figure is well above the comparable 6.5-percent California rate.  Economic security is far from Lake County residents’ reach because of the low educational attainment incidence in the area. Merely 17.5 percent of adults there possess bachelor’s degrees or higher. This percentage is compared to 35.3 percent of college-educated California adults.

Colorado: Bent County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 25.4% (Colorado: 9.6%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 14.2% (Colorado: 42.8%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 75.4 years (Colorado: 80 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$40,972 (Colorado: US$80,184)
County center: Las Animas
Bent County is one of the United States’ least recommended places to live in. This area in southeastern Colorado has 25.4 percent of its people living below the poverty line. This figure is greater than double the 9.6-percent Colorado poverty rate.
Thus, low-income county residents are less likely to afford healthy lifestyle options and essential preventative medical care services.
Moreover, the people in Bent County’s life expectancy at birth was recorded as merely 75.4 years. This age is about five years below the Colorado-wide average. Due to the elevated poverty percentage, CEOWorld Magazine’s analysts pointed to this economic indicator as causing Bent County’s lower-than-average life expectancy.

Connecticut: Windham County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 11.3% (Connecticut: 10%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 24.4% (Connecticut: 40.6%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 78.9 years (Connecticut: 81.1 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$71,418 (Connecticut: US$83,572)
County center: Willimantic
Windham County, Connecticut is the worst place to reside out of the state’s eight counties. This area in the northeastern portion of Connecticut along the Rhode Island and Massachusetts borders has a life expectancy of 78.9 years. This figure is more than two years lower than the state’s average. Additionally, Windham County residents have high poverty incidences. They are more likely to live below the poverty line compared to the common state residents. This reality is partly attributed to the low educational attainments Windham County residents have in general.

Delaware: Kent County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 13.3% (Delaware: 11.4%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 25.7% (Delaware: 33.6%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 77.3 years (Delaware: 78.3 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$63,715 (Delaware: US$72,724)
County center: Dover
Being a geographically tiny US state, Delaware merely has three counties. Therefore, the difference between itself and Kent County in various important socioeconomic indicators is not striking. CEOWorld Magazine rated Delaware’s Kent County as among the worst locations to live in the United States. This area’s 13.3-percent poverty ratio is a little higher than Delaware’s 11.4-percent rate. Furthermore, residents of Kent County’s life expectancy at birth is just one year below the average across Delaware. This area’s adults are less likely to be four-year college degree holders, compared to the common Delawareans, partly due to the unattractive socioeconomic landscape.

Florida: Union County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 17% (Florida: 13.1%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 11% (Florida: 31.5%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 67.7 years (Florida: 79.4 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$55,463 (Florida: US$61,777)
County center: Lake Butler
Union County in north Gainesville, Florida is among the least recommended locations to reside in. For every 100,000 individuals in this area, there are 37.3 deadly drug overdoses recorded from 2018 to 2021. This figure is among the highest in Florida’s 67 counties. Moreover, at merely 67.7 years, Union County is the sole location in the state with a life expectancy at birth of under 70 years. This low average figure in the area in Florida’s center is partly because of the high drug death rates. Union County is unappealing for people who want to live in educated neighborhoods. It is because just 11 percent of its residents are bachelor’s degree holders. This ratio is compared to 31.5 percent of college degree holders across Florida.

Georgia: Clinch County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 30.2% (Georgia: 13.9%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 11% (Georgia: 33%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 72.7 years (Georgia: 78 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$47,750 (Georgia: US$65,030)
County center: Homerville
Clinch County is the least recommended residential area in Georgia. The poverty rate in this location is greater than double the rate across the state. Additionally, Clinch County is not an advisable location to move to because finding plenty of wholesome lifestyle choices and affordable healthcare is unlikely there. The south-central Georgia county’s residents have a life expectancy at birth of merely 72.7 years, unlike the 78-year average across Georgia.

Hawaii: Hawaii County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 13.8% (Hawaii: 9.5%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 30.2% (Hawaii: 34.3%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 80.6 years (Hawaii: 81.9 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$68,399 (Hawaii: US$88,005)
County center: Hilo
Hawaii is one of the small US states with merely five counties. Hence, there is not a marked difference in socioeconomic results between a particular county there and the state itself. In Hawaii, Hawaii County lags behind the other counties in terms of important socioeconomic indicators. CEOWorld Magazine included this location as the least recommended place to live in because of the 13.8-percent poverty ratio. Hawaii County’s poverty rate is the second-highest among the island’s counties and is well above the state’s 9.5-percent poverty rate. It is not advisable to move to this location since there are minimal opportunities in employment, healthcare, education, and so forth. In Hawaii County, people’s life expectancy at birth is more elevated than the 79.1-year national average. Although it is at 80.6 years, this figure is lower than the Hawaii-wide 81.9-year average life expectancy.

Idaho: Shoshone County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 15.1% (Idaho: 11.4%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 11.3% (Idaho: 29.1%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 75 years (Idaho: 79.2 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$43,188 (Idaho: US$63,377)
County center: Wallace
In northern Idaho, Shoshone County along the Montana border is a mining site. This location is not a recommended place to reside in because economic difficulties prevail. Shoshone County’s 15.1-percent poverty rate is greater than the statewide rate of 11.4 percent. Furthermore, median annual household income in this Idaho region is roughly US$20,000 lower than the Idaho state median. These factors have contributed to inferior health conditions in Shoshone County. Furthermore, people’s life expectancy at birth there is 75 years, which is approximately four years below Idaho’s average.

Illinois: Alexander County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 24.5% (Illinois: 11.8%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 12.3% (Illinois: 36.2%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 74.4 years (Illinois: 79.6 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$39,871 (Illinois: US$72,563)
County center: Cairo
Illinois has 102 counties and Alexander County ranks as the least recommended location to live in. About 24.5 percent of this southern Illinois area’s residents live below the poverty line. This figure is greater than double the 11.8-percent Illinois poverty ratio. Besides economic hardships, prospective residents are dissuaded from transferring to Alexander County because it has meager options in terms of healthy lifestyle, affordable healthcare, education, and so forth. People’s life expectancy at birth in this Illinois county is merely 74.4 years, which is below the state’s average.

Indiana: Scott County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 16.6% (Indiana: 12.5%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 13.3% (Indiana: 27.8%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 71.9 years (Indiana: 77.1 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$45,794 (Indiana: US$61,944)
County center: Scottsburg
The 16.6-percent poverty rate in Scott County, Indiana makes it an unlikely choice for people intending to relocate. Such an economic figure is well above the Indiana-wide rate of 12.5 percent. People who value education and a well-educated neighborhood will also not find Scott County appealing. After all, adults in this area are approximately half as unlikely to earn a bachelor’s degree, compared to common Indiana residents who are 25 years old or older. Besides the high poverty incidence and residents’ low educational attainment in Scott County, life expectancy is also an issue at merely 71.9 years, which is below the 77.1-year average across Indiana.

Iowa: Appanoose County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 19.4% (Iowa: 11%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 18.9% (Iowa: 29.7%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 76.3 years (Iowa: 79.1 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$46,900 (Iowa: US$65,429)
County center: Centerville
Appanoose County is Iowa’s least recommended residential area. This place along the Missouri state border has 19.4 percent of its population existing below the poverty line, which is above 11 percent of Iowa’s population. Appanoose County’s impoverished residents struggle in terms of jobs, healthy lifestyles, and cost-effective healthcare services. Their plight has resulted in poor health conditions and low life expectancy, which is 76.3 years. This figure is almost three years below the Iowa average.

Kansas: Harper County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 17.6% (Kansas: 11.5%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 16.8% (Kansas: 34.4%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 74.9 years (Kansas: 78.4 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$52,188 (Kansas: US$64,521)
County center: Anthony

Harper County, Kansas is among CEOWorld Magazine’s entries in its list of worst US counties to reside in. This site along the Oklahoma border is among the poorest regions of Kansas with a 17.6-percent poverty ratio. This number is well above the 11.5-percent Kansas-wide rate. Earning bachelor’s degrees is hard to come by for Harper County residents due to the prevailing financial insecurity and low-income status of the people. Merely 16.8 percent of this area’s adult population earned college degrees, compared to 34.4 percent of Kansas’s college-educated adults.

Kentucky: Wolfe County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 34.6% (Kentucky: 16.3%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 6.6% (Kentucky: 25.7%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 70.4 years (Kentucky: 75.8 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$24,349 (Kentucky: US$55,454)
County center: Campton
Kentucky’s Wolfe County is among the least recommended residential sites in the United States. 34.6 percent of this area’s population lives below the poverty line. This rate is greater than double the 16.3-percent Kentucky-wide poverty scale. Moreover, most Wolfe County residents are not college-educated. Less than one in every 10 adults there possesses a bachelor’s degree, unlike over one in every four Kentucky adults. With the high poverty and financial insecurity incidences and people’s low educational attainments, Wolfe County has lost a considerable number of its residents. From 2015 to 2021, about 8.2 percent of the county’s people left the area, even as Kentucky’s populace grew by 2.2 percent.

Louisiana: East Carroll Parish
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 47.3% (Louisiana: 18.8%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 10.2% (Louisiana: 25.5%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 71.5 years (Louisiana: 75.7 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$25,049 (Louisiana: US$53,571)
County center: Lake Providence
East Carroll Parish in Louisiana is one of the economically challenged locations in the United States. Approximately 47.3 percent of its residents are poor, which is well over Louisiana’s 18.8-percent poverty rate. People’s life expectancy at birth is impacted by the high poverty incidence in East Carroll Parish. It is 71.5 years, which is over four years below the Louisiana average of 75.7 years and about seven years below the 79.1-year national average.
Residents who left East Carroll Parish cited the low quality of life in the area as the primary reason for their decision to move elsewhere.

Maine: Somerset County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 17.9% (Maine: 11%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 19.9% (Maine: 33.6%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 76.7 years (Maine: 78.7 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$47,488 (Maine: US$63,182)
County center: Skowhegan
Somerset County is one of the worst locations to transfer to, per CEOWorld Magazine. This place stretching from the United States’ northern border with Canada and down through Maine’s central portion has a 17.9-percent poverty rate.

This figure is much higher than the 11-percent Maine poverty ratio. Due to financial hardships, most adults in Somerset County did not finish college. Merely 19.9 percent earned a bachelor’s degree or higher, compared to the 33.6 percent of Maine adults who graduated from college.

Maryland: Baltimore
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 20.3% (Maryland: 9.2%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 34.2% (Maryland: 41.6%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 72.9 years (Maryland: 79.3 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$54,124  (Maryland: US$91,431)
County center: Towson
Maryland is the United States’ richest state, making it an ideal place to reside in. It has a median annual household income of US$91,431. Nonetheless, Maryland’s independent city, Baltimore, is the opposite. Of the state’s 24 primary local jurisdictions, this urban area has the most widespread economic and financial problems.

Poverty in Baltimore can be seen in a typical household, earning merely US$54,124 yearly. Over one in every five people in this county exists below the poverty line, unlike the fewer than one in each 10 Maryland residents. Baltimore has inferior health conditions for its people. The recorded life expectancy at birth is merely 72.9 years. This number is lower compared to any Maryland county and well below the 79.3-year Maryland-wide average.

Massachusetts: Hampden County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 15.9% (Massachusetts: 9.9%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 28.2% (Massachusetts: 45.2%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 78 years (Massachusetts: 80.3 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$61,310 (Massachusetts: US$89,026)
County center: Springfield
Hampden County is in southern Massachusetts. This area along the Connecticut border is one of the worst US counties to live in. Massachusetts is the world’s education center, being the seat of the prestigious Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. However, this US state is also the site of Hampden County where just 28.2 percent of its residents earned bachelor’s degrees. This ratio is compared to the 45.2 percent of adults across Massachusetts possessing college degrees such as bachelor’s and even higher. Hampden County residents’ life expectancy at birth is 78 years, which is almost 2.5 years below the Massachusetts-wide average of 80.3 years.

Michigan: Clare County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 23.7% (Michigan: 13.3%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 12.1% (Michigan: 30.6%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 75.2 years (Michigan: 78 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$43,069 (Michigan: US$63,202)
County center: Harrison
It is not advisable for people to move to Clare County, Michigan. This area centrally located on the state’s Lower Peninsula has a 23.7-percent poverty rate, which is much higher than the 13.3-percent state poverty ratio.

People who value a well-educated neighborhood will also not find Clare County as a good choice. After all, merely 12.1 percent of this area’s adult population possesses bachelor’s degrees or higher. This figure is less than half of the 30.6-percent share of Michigan adults with college degrees. In Clare County, people’s life expectancy at birth is just 75.2 years. This number is almost three years shorter than the Michigan average.

Minnesota: Mahnomen County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 21.1% (Minnesota: 9.2%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 12.9% (Minnesota: 37.6%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 74.4 years (Minnesota: 80.6 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$48,021 (Minnesota: US$77,706)
County center: Mahnomen
Due to the poor living conditions in Mahnomen County, this place in Minnesota made it to CEOWorld Magazine’s list of the worst counties to live in the United States. The 21.1-percent high poverty incidence, which is more elevated than the 9.2-percent state average, is a clear discouragement for residents and potential residents. Additionally, merely 12.9 percent of Mahnomen County’s population aged 25 years and older possesses a bachelor’s degree. This figure is less than half of the 37.6-percent share of Minnesota adults with a four-year college degree. With inferior living conditions, Mahnomen County’s population has continued to shrink. Minnesota’s populace grew by 4.6 percent. However, in Mahnomen County, the resident number has diminished by 1.2 percent since 2015.

Mississippi: Quitman County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 34.8% (Mississippi: 19.4%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 11.2% (Mississippi: 23.2%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 70.5 years (Mississippi: 74.7 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$25,783 (Mississippi: US$49,111)
County center: Marks
Mississippi is the poorest state in the United States with a 19.4-percent poverty rate. Its northwest corner, Quitman County, is its most impoverished area. The poverty ratio in this location is 34.8 percent, which is greater than double the rate across Mississippi. With this reality and other negative factors like inferior lifestyle and healthcare options, Quitman County is labeled as among the least recommended places to live in. People’s life expectancy at birth in this Mississippi county is merely 70.5 years. This figure is well below the 74.7-year average life expectancy Mississippi-wide and the 79.1-year nationwide average.

Missouri: Pemiscot County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 27.5% (Missouri: 12.8%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 11.7% (Missouri: 30.7%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 71.4 years (Missouri: 77.5 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$35,865 (Missouri: US$61,043)
County center: Caruthersville
Pemiscot County is among the United States’ worst residential areas. The 27.5-percent poverty rate in this part of Missouri is greater than double the 12.8-percent poverty ratio statewide.

People’s life expectancy at birth in Pemiscot County is merely 71.4 years. This number is much lower than the 77.5-year average across Missouri. The negative socioeconomic measures demonstrated by Pemiscot County make it an unlikely site for relocation. Its population has, in fact, shrunk by 10.6 percent from 2015 to 2021. This reality is despite the Missouri populace expanding by 1.6 percent over the same period.

Montana: Roosevelt County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 32.3% (Montana: 12.5%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 19.4% (Montana: 33.7%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 69.5 years (Montana: 78.7 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$47,182 (Montana: US$60,560)
County center: Wolf Point
Plenty of Native American reservations in the United States have become among the poorest communities in the country. This reality is due to numerous modernization and historical factors. Roosevelt County close to Montana’s northeast corner is among these impoverished sites. This area within the Fort Peck Indian Reservation has approximately 32.3 percent of its populace living below the poverty line.

This number is greater than double the 12.5-percent share of Montana residents. Roosevelt County has lost many of its people who complained about the inferior healthcare conditions in the area. The poor living conditions there are manifested by the 69.5-year life expectancy at birth, which is almost a decade below the 78.7-year Montana average.

Nebraska: Thurston County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 20.5% (Nebraska: 10.3%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 18.9% (Nebraska: 32.9%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 73.3 years (Nebraska: 79.5 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$56,223 (Nebraska: US$66,644)
County center: Pender
The worst place to live in the US state of Nebraska is Thurston County. This area in the northeastern part of the state has a 20.5-percent poverty rate. This figure is the highest of the 93 Nebraska counties and well above the 10.3-percent state poverty ratio.

People in Thurston County’s life expectancy at birth is 73.3 years, which is six years shorter than the average figure Nebraska-wide. The area’s population has decreased due to the county lagging in important socioeconomic indicators like healthcare, education, employment, and so forth. From 2015 to 2021, Thurston County’s populace plummeted by 2 percent. This fact is despite Nebraska’s population expanding by 4.4 percent in that period.

Nevada: Nye County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 15.6% (Nevada: 12.9%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 12.7% (Nevada: 26.1%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 74.6 years (Nevada: 79.1 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$52,570 (Nevada: US$65,686)
County center: Tonopah
Nye County is along the southern Nevada border with California and extends north towards the state’s center. It is among Nevada’s 17 counties. CEOWorld Magazine listed Nye County as among the worst locations to transfer to because of its 15.6-percent poverty ratio. This rate is greater than the 12.9-percent figure across Nevada. The poor living conditions in Nye County are manifested by the 74.6-year life expectancy, which is lower than the 79.1-year figure Nevada-wide. Additionally, because of poverty, merely 12.7 percent of Nye County adults obtained a bachelor’s degree or higher. This number is less than half of the 26.1-percent share of adults across Nevada who have college degrees.

New Hampshire: Coos County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 10.9% (New Hampshire: 7.4%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 20% (New Hampshire: 38.2%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 76.6 years (New Hampshire: 79.4 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$52,054 (New Hampshire: US$83,449)
County center: Lancaster
Coos County spans across New Hampshire’s northernmost section, bordering Vermont, Maine, and Canada. It is the least recommended location to reside in of the 10 New Hampshire counties. Coos County’s discouraging 10.9-percent poverty rate is almost the highest in the state. It is also well above the 7.4-percent figure across New Hampshire.

The substandard living conditions in Coos County are reflected by the residents’ life expectancy at birth, which is just 76.6 years. This number is almost three years less than the life expectancy New Hampshire-wide.

New Jersey: Cumberland County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 15.7% (New Jersey: 9.8%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 17% (New Jersey: 41.5%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 75.4 years (New Jersey: 80.6 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$58,397 (New Jersey: US$89,703)
County center: Bridgeton
Cumberland County along New Jersey’s southern border is one of the worst places to live in the United States. This area is one of New Jersey’s 21 counties and has a 15.7-percent poverty rate, which is higher than the state’s 9.8-percent ratio.
Cumberland County residents are highly likely to exist below the poverty line. The life expectancy at birth in this area is merely 75.4 years, which is more than five years below New Jersey’s average.

New Mexico: McKinley County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 34% (New Mexico: 18.3%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 12.2% (New Mexico: 28.5%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 72.3 years (New Mexico: 78.3 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$40,262 (New Mexico: US$54,020)
County center: Gallup
McKinley County in northwestern New Mexico spans sections of Zuni Pueblo and the Navajo Nation. As a Native American reservation, it is among the poorest communities in the United States that have grappled with modernization and historical factors.
Approximately 34 percent of McKinley County’s populace exists below the poverty line. This rate is well above the 18.3-percent share of New Mexico residents. In terms of life expectancy at birth, McKinley County lags considerably behind the New Mexico average. This figure is just 72.3 years, unlike the 78.3-year average New Mexico-wide.

New York: Cattaraugus County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 17.3% (New York: 13.5%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 20% (New York: 38.1%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 77.7 years (New York: 81.4 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$53,537 (New York: US$75,157)
County center: Little Valley
The 17.3-percent poverty rate in New York’s Cattaraugus County makes it the least recommended place to relocate to in the state. This figure is well above the 13.5-percent New York poverty scale.
Cattaraugus County, which is in western New York and along the Pennsylvania border, is one of New York’s 62 counties. People who value a college education and an educated neighborhood shy away from this area.
Low educational attainment rates in Cattaraugus County are reflected by just 20 percent of local adults possessing college degrees. This number is below the 38.1 percent of New York adults with bachelor’s degrees.
The undesirable living conditions in Cattaraugus County have driven people away. This area’s populace has decreased by 2.2 percent since 2015. This reality is despite the continuous growth of New York State’s population.

North Carolina: Robeson County
Poverty rate (5-year estimate, 2021): 27.3% (North Carolina: 13.7%)
Bachelor’s degree (5-year estimate, 2021): 14.2% (North Carolina: 33%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 73 years (North Carolina: 78.2 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$36,736 (North Carolina: US$60,516)
County center: Lumberton
Robeson County, North Carolina is along the South Carolina border. This area is among the worst places to reside in because of the 27.3-percent poverty ratio, which is way higher than the 13.7-percent state average.
People feel discouraged from living in Robeson County due to the educational backgrounds of most residents. Merely 14.2 percent of people aged 25 years old and older earned bachelor’s degrees, unlike the 33 percent of college-educated adults in North Carolina.
Additionally, the people in Robeson County’s life expectancy at birth is merely 73 years, which is about five years below the North Carolina figure. Because of the high incidences of poverty, the residents’ low educational attainments, and other poor socioeconomic indicators, many Robeson County residents have left the area.
The population of this part of North Carolina has dwindled by 11.9 percent from 2015 to 2021. This development is despite North Carolina’s population growing by 5.3 percent during the same period.

North Dakota: Sioux County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 38.5% (North Dakota: 10.7%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 13.6% (North Dakota: 31.1%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 67.3 years (North Dakota: 79 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$39,755 (North Dakota: US$68,131)
County center: Fort Yates
Sioux County is a rural area in southern North Dakota. Its population has fallen by 8.8 percent between 2015 and 2021, despite the North Dakota populace expanding by 7.2 percent.
The reason behind this trend in Sioux County is the clearly elevated poverty rate of 38.5 percent. This number is way above North Dakota’s 10.7-percent ratio. Sioux County residents are more than threefold as likely to be poor than the common North Dakota residents.
At just 67.3 years, the people in Sioux County’s life expectancy at birth is almost 12 years below the state average. With short life expectancy and financial insecurity prevailing, the low educational attainment incidence has also discouraged people from living in Sioux County.
Just 13.6 percent of adults there hold bachelor’s degrees or higher. This number is less than half of the 31.1-percent share of college-educated adults North Dakota-wide.

Ohio: Scioto County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 23.8% (Ohio: 13.4%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 16.4% (Ohio: 29.7%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 72.7 years (Ohio: 77 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$43,266 (Ohio: US$61,938)
County center: Portsmouth
The US state of Ohio has 88 counties and Scioto County is the worst residential location. This area along the state’s southern border has 23.8 percent of its population living below the poverty line. This percentage is almost the highest of any Ohio county and well above the 13.4-percent state poverty scale.
Furthermore, Scioto County has almost the lowest life expectancy at birth in any county in Ohio, which is just 72.7 years. This figure is over four years shorter than the statewide average.

Oklahoma: Okfuskee County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 27.6% (Oklahoma: 15.2%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 10.7% (Oklahoma: 26.8%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 71.6 years (Oklahoma: 76.1 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$43,000 (Oklahoma: US$56,956)
County center: Okemah
Okfuskee County is one of the least recommended locations to live in the United States. Jobs can be found in this east-central Oklahoma area, such as those in a correctional facility and several manufacturing plants. Nevertheless, these major employers in Okfuskee County do not usually pay high wages. A typical household in this Oklahoma area takes home merely US$43,000 per year. Moreover, 27.6 percent of Okfuskee County’s population lives below the poverty line. This percentage is compared to a median income of US$56,956 and a poverty ratio of 15.2 percent across Oklahoma. Life expectancy at birth across Oklahoma is 76.1 years. However, with the poor living conditions, Okfuskee County merely has 71.6 years. Of the 77 counties that make up Oklahoma, this area is not an advisable spot where people can satisfactorily relocate.

Oregon: Klamath County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 19.1% (Oregon: 12.1%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 21.1% (Oregon: 35%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 76 years (Oregon: 79.6 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$50,790 (Oregon: US$70,084)
County center: Klamath Falls
Klamath County, Oregon is along the state’s southern border with California. With a 19.1-percent poverty rate, which is well above the Oregon poverty ratio of 12.1 percent, Klamath County is among the worst residential areas. Life expectancy on this site is just 76 years, which is more than three and a half years less than Oregon’s average. In terms of educational attainment, just 21.1 percent of Klamath County adults possess bachelor’s degrees, which is compared to 35 percent of adults Oregon-wide. These adverse living conditions coupled with lagging healthcare services have made the area an unsuitable residential location.

Pennsylvania: Forest County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 16.7% (Pennsylvania: 11.8%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 11.2% (Pennsylvania: 33.1%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 76.7 years (Pennsylvania: 78.7 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$43,958 (Pennsylvania: US$67,587)
County center: Tionesta
16.7 percent of Forest County’s populace lives below the poverty line. This area in western Pennsylvania actually possesses one of the top three highest poverty ratios of all 67 Pennsylvania counties. Forest County is also a laggard when it comes to life expectancy at birth. CEOWorld Magazine recorded this figure as just 76.7 years, which is compared to the 78.7-year average Pennsylvania-wide. Forest County’s population has declined since 2015, with 6.1 percent of its residents deciding to move elsewhere. This development has happened despite Pennsylvania’s populace growing by 1.5 percent in the same period.

Rhode Island: Providence County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 13.6% (Rhode Island: 11.3%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 30.6% (Rhode Island: 35.3%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 79.1 years (Rhode Island: 79.5 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$65,797 (Rhode Island: US$74,489)
County center: Providence
Rhode Island is the smallest US state with just five counties. This fact makes the difference between itself and Providence County in terms of several significant socioeconomic indicators not especially striking. In Rhode Island, Providence County is the least recommended residential area. The poverty rate there is 13.6 percent, which is not much greater than the 11.3-percent Rhode Island rate. Additionally, Providence County’s recorded life expectancy is 79.1 years. This number is close to the 79.5-year average across Rhode Island. Providence County adults are considerably less likely to be bachelor’s degree holders, compared to the typical Rhode Island resident. Merely 30.6 percent of the 25-year-old and older population in the area graduated from college. This figure is compared to 35.3 percent of Rhode Island’s college-educated populace.

South Carolina: Marlboro County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 28% (South Carolina: 14.5%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 8% (South Carolina: 29.8%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 71.7 years (South Carolina: 76.8 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$32,136 (South Carolina: US$58,234)
County center: Bennettsville
South Carolina is one of the rapidly expanding US states. It reported a 6.3-percent population growth between 2015 and 2021. Nonetheless, Marlboro County is the opposite. This South Carolina residential site along the North Carolina border recorded a 3.9-percent population decrease over the same time frame. Many disgruntled residents who left Marlboro County pointed to the 28-percent poverty rate, which is almost double South Carolina’s 14.5-percent ratio, as among the reasons for their decision to relocate elsewhere. Furthermore, Marlboro County has fared poorly when it comes to health conditions. The local life expectancy at birth is just 71.7 years, which is lower than the 76.8-year South Carolina-wide average.

South Dakota: Oglala Lakota County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 50.5% (South Dakota: 12.5%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 10.4% (South Dakota: 30%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 64.5 years (South Dakota: 78.7 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$33,192 (South Dakota: US$63,920)
County center: Hot Springs
Similar to many Native American reservations on this list, Oglala Lakota County has struggled economically. About 50.5 percent of its populace live below the poverty line. This percentage is greater than four times the 12.5-percent share of South Dakota residents. Oglala Lakota County, which is in southern South Dakota and encompasses segments of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, has a low life expectancy, compared to much of the state. It is merely 64.5 years, unlike the 78.7-year average South Dakota-wide.

Tennessee: Hancock County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 29.1% (Tennessee: 14.3%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 11.1% (Tennessee: 29%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 72.1 years (Tennessee: 75.8 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$29,650 (Tennessee: US$58,516)
County center: Sneedville
CEOWorld Magazine listed Hancock County in northern Tennessee as among the worst locations to live in the United States. One of the main reasons for its qualification in the publication’s roster is its 29.1-percent poverty ratio. This rate is substantially greater than the 14.3-percent rate across Tennessee. The widespread poverty in Hancock County is caused by the weak employment market in the area. About 8.8 percent of the local workforce was out of jobs in the past five years. This percentage is compared to the 5.3-percent Tennessee-wide jobless rate. Furthermore, Hancock County’s recorded life expectancy at birth is only 72.1 years, which is well below the 75.8-year average in Tennessee.

Texas: Cochran County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 27.1% (Texas: 14%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 9.7% (Texas: 31.5%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 74.8 years (Texas: 78.9 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$38,203 (Texas: US$67,321)
County center: Morton
Cochran County is the least recommended site to relocate to out of the 254 counties in Texas. Abject financial insecurity has marred the life quality of the residents living in this central Texas area along the New Mexico border. Approximately 27.1 percent of Cochran County’s population exists below the poverty line. This number is almost twice the 14-percent poverty scale across Texas. People in Cochran County’s life expectancy at birth is merely 74.8 years, which is greater than four years below the Texas-wide average. With a majority of its residents being poor, college education is not within the people’s reach. Only 9.7 percent of adults in Cochran County are holders of bachelor’s degrees or higher. This percentage is well below the 31.5-percent share of adults across Texas who are college-educated.

Utah: Carbon County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 16.3% (Utah: 8.8%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 16.7% (Utah: 35.4%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 75.8 years (Utah: 79.9 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$51,725 (Utah: US$79,133)County center: Price
Of the 29 counties in the US state of Utah, Carbon County ranked as the worst location to live in, per CEOWorld Magazine’s list. This area in the southeast of Provo has a 16.3-percent poverty rate. This percentage is the third highest of any county in Utah and is well above the 8.8-percent poverty ratio statewide. Just 16.7 percent of Carbon County residents have bachelor’s degrees, compared to 35.4 percent of Utah adults over 24 years old who are college-educated. Although Utah is among the fastest-expanding US states, Carbon County recorded a 3.4-percent decline in its people from 2015 to 2021. The poor economic conditions have largely pushed people out of the area. Carbon County’s five-year average unemployment rate of 6.8 percent is almost double the comparable 3.5-percent ratio across Utah.

Vermont: Essex County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 14.7% (Vermont: 10.5%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 19.9% (Vermont: 40.9%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 78.5 years (Vermont: 79.9 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$48,194 (Vermont: US$67,674)
County center: Guildhall
Vermont is among the geographically small US states, with just 14 counties. This fact makes its difference with Essex County in terms of several important socioeconomic factors not pronounced. Essex County is one of the worst places to reside in the United States. The 14.7-percent poverty ratio is greater than the 10.5-percent Vermont-wide average. At 78.5 years, people’s life expectancy at birth in Essex County is close to the 79.9-year state average. Adults in this area who are bachelor’s degree holders are merely 19.9 percent, compared to the 40.9 percent of Vermont residents aged 25 years old and older who graduated from college.

Virginia: Martinsville
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 25.4% (Virginia: 9.9%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 22.1% (Virginia: 40.3%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 67.9 years (Virginia: 79.6 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$36,832 (Virginia: US$80,615)
Martinsville, Virginia is an independent urban area above the North Carolina border. This area is Virginia’s worst site to live in out of the state’s 134 counties and county equivalents. Greater than one in every four Martinsville residents exists below the poverty line, which translates to 25.4 percent of the population. As for the life expectancy of Martinsville residents at birth, it is just 67.9 years, which is more than ten years below the Virginia-wide average. Martinsville has lost residents more rapidly than it has drawn them to the area due to the inferior socioeconomic conditions. The county’s population dropped by 1.1 percent from 2015 to 2021. This development is the opposite of Virginia’s case, in which its populace grew by 3.9 percent over the same period.

Washington: Grays Harbor County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 15.1% (Washington: 10%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 16.3% (Washington: 37.3%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 76.7 years (Washington: 80.1 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$53,615 (Washington: US$82,400)
County center: Montesano
In Washington state, Grays Harbor County is the least recommended residential location. 15.1 percent of its residents exist below the poverty line. This percentage is compared to just 10 percent of Washington residents. Additionally, Grays Harbor County is one of merely two of the state’s 39 counties where fewer than 17 percent of residents earned a bachelor’s degree or higher. Its 16.3-percent rate of bachelor’s degree attainment is less than half of the comparable ratio of 37.3 percent across Washington.

West Virginia: McDowell County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 28.9% (West Virginia: 16.9%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 6.4% (West Virginia: 21.8%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 69 years (West Virginia: 75.4 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$30,127 (West Virginia: US$50,884)
County center: Welch
In the early to mid-20th century, West Virginia’s McDowell County served as the United States’ largest coal-producing area. Nonetheless, this location has suffered from long-term economic deterioration, similar to many coal-producing sites. Today, McDowell County is the least recommended residential area out of West Virginia’s 55 counties. Its 28.9-percent poverty rate is well above the 16.9 percent state poverty scale. Moreover, an average of 13.5 percent of McDowell County’s labor force has been out of jobs in the past five years. Health conditions are generally poor in the site and the life expectancy at birth there is just 69 years, which is more than six years below West Virginia’s rate. McDowell County has been an unattractive residential area due to the inferior living conditions there. Thus, its populace has shrunk by 7.1 percent since 2015.

Wisconsin: Menominee County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 26.2% (Wisconsin: 10.7%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 18.4% (Wisconsin: 31.5%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 73 years (Wisconsin: 79.5 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$54,940 (Wisconsin: US$67,080)
County center: Keshena
Wisconsin’s Menominee County is among CEOWorld Magazine’s worst places to live in. Among the factors that have pushed its residents away is the 26.2-percent poverty rate, which is greater than double the 10.7-percent Wisconsin-wide figure. Additionally, about 12.5 percent of Menominee County’s workforce has been unemployed over the past five years. This percentage is greater than triple the 3.5-percent Wisconsin jobless ratio. Many of Menominee County residents are unable to enjoy job security and greater financial stability because merely 18.4 percent of its residents possess bachelor’s degrees or higher. This number is well below the 31.5-percent share of Wisconsin adults who are college-educated.

Wyoming: Fremont County
Rate of poverty (5-year estimate, 2021): 13.5% (Wyoming: 10.7%)
Bachelor’s degree holders (5-year estimate, 2021): 24.7% (Wyoming: 28.5%)
People’s life expectancy at birth, 2019: 75.8 years (Wyoming: 79 years)
Median yearly household income (5-year estimate, 2021): US$57,887 (Wyoming: US$68,002)
County center: Lander
Fremont County in Wyoming’s central section is an economically challenged area, making it among the least recommended residential sites. It is common to find a family in this area taking home just US$57,887 in wages annually. This salary rate is well below the median household income across Wyoming worth US$68,002. With a 13.5-percent poverty rate, Fremont County’s residents are a bit more likely to live below the poverty line compared to a regular Wyoming resident. People in Fremont County’s life expectancy at birth is 75.8 years. Of all the 23 Wyoming counties, this figure is the lowest and is more than four years below the 79-year average across the state.

CEOWorld Magazine’s list of the worst counties in the United States to live in is based on the United Nations Development Programme’s Human Development Index (UNDP HDI). The latter’s purpose is to give a more comprehensive measure than just economic advancement.

The UNDP HDI focuses on people’s quality of life and capabilities within a particular region or country. From this source, CEOWorld Magazine used four indices to determine the worst counties in each US state.

These measures comprise the poverty rate and the people’s bachelor’s degree attainment. The people’s average life expectancy at birth and median annual household income were also among the considerations in creating the list.

CEOWorld Magazine used statistics from the 2021 U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey and the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation. The publication’s list of the worst counties in the United States indicated that there are areas in the world’s largest economy that need government and private sector intervention. Through investments by both public and private organizations, the least recommended residential areas in the 50 states of the United States can develop economically and socially. Some of them which used to be boomtowns can also regain or revive their prosperous conditions.


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CEOWORLD magazine - Latest - Special Reports - U.S. Counties With the Worst Quality of Life In Every State
Sheena Ricarte
News & Features Editor at the CEOWORLD magazine. I'm a veteran digital storyteller with a record of creating best-in-class content and commerce experiences. Specialties: Implementing top-level content strategies. Maintaining high editorial standards in fast-paced environments. Managing external media partnerships and collaborations. Mentoring staff and managing teams of contributors. Promoting diverse and inclusive viewpoints. I am always on the lookout for unique stories that go beyond the grit and grind of everyday headlines.