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Thursday, December 5, 2019

C-Suite Advisory

10 Tips to Increase Productivity of Photographers

Photography

Productivity isn’t a magical pill we can swallow. Being a workhouse who’s always creating, and editing isn’t always possible. Especially in today’s distraction-heavy world. Here are several tips for increasing productivity.

  1. Remove Dust

    Removing sensor dust from multiple images will make post-production work easier for you. In have Adobe Camera Raw: select the Spot Removal tool icon, make sure the Visualize Dust box is checked. Adjust the slider. The spots will be visible and then you can remove them – from all images you’ve selected.

  2. Plan for Fun

    Other people need a reward at the end of the day. Enter: a fun time. Yes, planning for Fun gives you a great thing to look forward to. “Work hard, play hard” as the old adage goes. This is especially crucial to do in today’s over-worked world.

  3. Toxicity

    Are there Debbie Downers in your life? These types of people must be avoided – they make a living at dragging you down with them. On the flip side: spending time with people with uncontrollable enthusiasm, will rub off on you.

  4. Toolboxes

    In Photoshop, customize your tools. It’ll appear in any workspace. This gives you the ability to save a retouching workspace – using tools you specifically use for retouching. It’s like having an array of toolboxes at your disposal.

  5. Tasks

    Our brains fog up. Therefore, write things down to make sure you don’t forget anything. Whether it’s “pick up a new lens” or “take out the garbage” – include everything that you have to do for the day.

  6. Exclusions

    Productivity and distractions clash with each other like health and pizza. If you want to be a more productive photographer, you must put away devices. Phones. Tablets. Laptops. Anything that connects you to social media. You are working – leave your social life behind for now.

  7. Groups

    If you’re shooting event photography, getting a group picture may be difficult. Shoot people in clusters. In Photoshop, make sure there is at least a 30-40% overlap. Open each image as a layer. Select Edit > Auto-Align Layers > Auto to see every subject/layer lined up as a group. This saves you time as a photographer from trying to line everybody up perfectly.

  8. Intention

    We all know the benefits of shooting many pictures to get the “right one.” Shooting with intent will sharpen your skills for capturing the perfect image, the first time. You will put more thought and consideration into making sure the setting is just right – instead of firing away willy-nilly.

  9. Pomodoro

    The concept is simple: grab a timer and set a time limit (usually 25 minutes). Do absolutely nothing except the project for that time. Then take a 5-minute break. Equaling 30 minutes total, this is called one round. Do 4 and then take an hour-long break.

  10. Retouch Eyes

    Shooting portraits is a delicate, subtle art. Retouching eyes is an absolute must to capture the “serenity” of the subjects. Let Lightroom help you by increasing the exposure and clarity with the Adjustment Brush. Use PS to create a mask for the eyes, adjust as necessary, and use the Smart Sharpen option. They simply make eyes “pop”.

This list of tips isn’t exhaustive. It’s highly recommended that you start with a few of the principles and techniques listed here, and work with them only if you notice their actual benefits. As always, productivity is not a magic pill; it requires hard work, resilience and grit and an intense dedication to your art. The way a sensei is dedicated to his/her martial art.


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Sophie Ireland
Foreign Correspondent for ​CEOWORLD magazine media. Policy Advisor, writer, professional restaurant recommender, and native New Yorker. I have approximate knowledge of many things.
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