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Wednesday, June 12, 2024
CEOWORLD magazine - Archive in Mordecai Kurz

Mordecai Kurz

Mordecai Kurz

Mordecai Kurz is Joan Kenney Professor of Economics, Emeritus at Stanford University. He is the author of The Market Power of Technology: Understanding the Second Gilded Age (Columbia University Press, January 2023). He has written extensively on Neoclassical Growth Theory, General Equilibrium Theory, Game Theory, and Income Distribution, as well as various policy projects on inequality and growth. Kurz served as the Director of Economics for The Institute for Mathematical Studies in the Social Sciences (IMSSS) at Stanford University from 1969 to 1989, and for twenty years directed the most effective economics research workshops in the profession’s history.

Kurz has also served as a special economic advisor to both the U.S. and Canadian governments, notably serving as a special economic advisor to President Carter’s Commission on Pension Policy in 1979. His vast experience in the field of economics has allowed him both the ability and experience to participate in research at the highest level, and to offer expert advice on subjects such as inequality and economic policy. His previous publications include Public Investment, the Rate of Return, and Optimal Fiscal Policy (with Kenneth J. Arrow, 1970) and Endogenous Economic Fluctuations: Studies in the Theory of Rational Beliefs (ed. 1997), as well as many publications across several fields of economic theory. His new book, The Market Power of Technology: Understanding the Second Gilded Age, will be published in January 2023.


Mordecai Kurz is an opinion columnist for the CEOWORLD magazine.For more information, visit the author’s website CLICK HERE.
Mordecai Kurz
CEO Insider

Antitrust Policy Is Contradicted By Patent Laws

The FTC opened a broad antitrust campaign against leading high tech companies, aiming to curb their power and thwart their expansion. Although the market power of these firms is derived from their monopoly over powerful technologies, the FTC cannot attack this power directly because it is legal and strongly supported...