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Phone Etiquette Mistakes That Drive Customers Away

You think that a phone answering etiquette is simple and you can’t practically make any mistake. Several answering errors can drive your customers away from you. You need to optimize your customer service so that it only affects your development in a positive way.

Phone customer service builds up trust. The customers feel safer when listening to a real voice. They feel physical help and hear the warmth in the sound of a company representative.

A negative phone experience can be disrupting for your company’s reputation. We are talking about long hold times, no answer at all, or lack of professionalism from the representative. You might not realize this, but these simple mistakes can damage your business very much. Studies show that customers with bad phone service experience tend to drive away to the competitor services. They don’t even get to purchase a product. Even a simple call can affect their decision.

For small businesses, a simple social media, or email customer services are most suitable. But there will always be customers that prefer communication via phone. And you know that customer’s always right. You need to adapt to your customer’s tastes and needs. If you need a business phone number, try acquiring a free phone number from these services. Consult with professionals to learn more about this.

Avoiding these mistakes can save your company’s reputation: 

*Too many choices

Having too many menu options can be frustrating for a caller. While you might think that you’re helping them with detailed options, you might be losing their time too.

Try keeping your menu options simple and short. Include three options and avoid adding any more. You need to make them feel that you are taking care of their interests and their time too.

Remember that confusion will also affect the customer service quality. They might forget the questions they have, they might get angry and frustrated, experiencing a completely negative call center service.

*Using too much of Interactive Voice Response

IVRs save our time and efforts. But it also makes the call center experience less humane and more robotic. You are making it difficult for your customers to speak with a human.

IVRs can be troubling for some callers. Voice recognition, understanding and hearing can be tough. Some of the older customers can have too many errors while speaking with IVRs. Some of the customers have the problems that only humans can understand. And you may not give the option of a specific problem a customer is experiencing.

Keep in mind that customers are calling because they need to hear a trustworthy human voice. Keep it simple and organized. Implement IVRs, but also give the choice to directly contact a customer service representative. Your customers will thank you.

*Not realizing the importance of IVRs in branding

The customer is calling and your IVR is answering. You don’t want your caller to hear the boring old robotic voice when they first interact with your company.

Remember that your call center is your company’s brand representative. Don’t trap yourself in traditional and obsolete techniques. Make a positive good impression on your callers. Use the voice that your customers will find appealing. Use the voice that’s relatable to them.

*No requests for a feedback

By not asking a feedback at the end of the customer service experience, you might be driving away your customers.  You need to determine if your IVR is hurting or benefiting your business.

Ask your customers about their experience. Tell them that you want to improve your customer service, and you need their help to describe their final thoughts.

VIRs are great for optimizing your business. You will be able to develop your customer service, your brand name, and exposure. Try avoiding these mistakes for better customer experience.

 

Aimee Lee Webber

Aimee Lee WebberVerified account

Reporter at CEOWORLD Magazine
Editorial Aide/Reporter at The CEOWORLD magazine. Nationally Syndicated Advice Columnist. Generally prefer dogs to humans. Loves dragons. New Yorker.
Aimee Lee Webber

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