Stats Gate

Top 10 European countries with the highest risk of burnout, 2021

Portugal, Greece, and Latvia are the top 3 European countries experiencing burnout among their employees. In some countries in Europe maybe the employees haven’t experienced at all work-related stress but in some others, things are worse and it seems more relevant than ever to talk at this point about burnout and mental health in the workplace.

Let’s have a look at some essential data for the top three countries on the list.

In Portugal, the happiness index is 5.7 out of 10 while the average salary is estimated at about 22.000 euros per year. Employees work for almost 40 hours weekly. In Portugal, employees work more hours compared to the rest European countries that were examined. In Portugal, the percentage of reporting risk factors affecting mental well-being at work is 38,6%. Greece comes next as the percentage of reporting risk factors affecting mental well-being at work is 30,9%.

Mykonos, Greece

The happiness index in Greece is 5.3 out of 10 while employees work about 39 hours per week. The average salary is almost 23.000 euros per year. The 3rd European country on the list is Latvia where the percentage of reporting risk factors affecting mental well-being at work is 23,9%. The happiness index in Latvia is 5.9 out of 10. Employees work almost 39 hours per week and they receive on average 23.900 euros yearly.

At the same list are included seven more European countries with high percentages of reporting risk factors showing burnout. Hungary (4th place on the list) reported 20,3% risk factors affecting mental well-being at work while Slovakia (5th on the list) reported 26,8% risk factors affecting mental well-being at work. Poland, Slovenia, Estonia, and France are the four European countries completing the top 10 experiencing burnout among employees. Poland (7th place on the list) reported 18% of risk factors affecting mental well-being at work. Slovenia (8th place), Estonia (9th place), and France (10th place) reported 32%, 22,6%, and 60.5% risk factors affecting mental well-being at work respectively.

On the other hand, Denmark, Netherlands, Norway, Germany, Switzerland, Ireland, Belgium, Finland, Italy, and Sweden are the top 10 European countries with the least risk of burnout in Europe. In Denmark, the percentage of reporting risk factors affecting mental well-being at work is 16.7. In Netherlands and Norway, the percentage of reporting risk factors affecting mental well-being at work is 36.7 and 17.8 respectively.

Germany comes at the 4th place of the list with 16,8% reporting risk factors affecting mental well-being at work. In Switzerland (5th) and Ireland (6th), the percentage of reporting risk factors affecting mental well-being at work is 41.5% and 23.5% respectively. Belgium (8th), Finland (9th) and Italy (10th) complete the top 10. In Denmark, the percentage of reporting risk factors affecting mental well-being at work is 33.6, in Finland 41.5, and in Italy 27.1.

The above rankings are the result of many parameters that were taken into consideration. It is crucial mentioning that countries used to refer to OECD countries within Europe where full data was available for all metrics.

The top 10 countries reporting the most workplace mental health issues are: France (60.5%), Luxembourg (53.6%), Sweden (44.2%), Switzerland (41.5%), Finland (41.5%), Austria (40.8%), Portugal (38.6%), Iceland (37.6%), Netherlands (36.7%) and Belgium (33.6%).

The best five countries where employees enjoy a work-life balance are

Netherlands, Italy, Denmark, Spain, and France. In the Netherlands, employees work on average 29.3 hours per week while in Italy employees work on average 35.7 hours per week. In Denmark, employees work weekly on average 32.4 hours, in Spain 36.5 hours and in France 36.2 hours.

The worst five countries where employees don’t experience a good balance between work and life are

Iceland, UK, Austria, Poland, and Latvia. In Iceland people work on average 38,8 hours per week, in UK 36,6 hours per week, and in Austria 35,6 hours per week. In Poland, people work on average 39,8 hours weekly and in Latvia 39,1 hours.

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Maria Gourtsilidou
Maria Gourtsilidou is Senior Editor of Research and Data Analytics at the CEOWORLD magazine. She is responsible for driving thought leadership, using data analytics to showcase the company’s products and services, and fostering knowledge sharing between CEOWORLD magazine and client organizations. She studied Public Administration (Economics Of The Public Sector) in Greece and holds a Bachelor’s in Public Administration from the Panteion University of Political & Social Studies. Follow Maria Gourtsilidou on Twitter. Write at maria-gourtsilidou@ceoworld.biz.