Why Vine, six-second Video-sharing app by Twitter no longer accessible to everyone?

Well, guess what? Initially launched with a 12+ age rating, Twitter-owned  Vine, new Video-sharing app for the iPhone was upped to a 17+ rating, saying that the app “contains age-restricted material.” The iOS app Vine allows you to share six-second video clips.
No longer accessible to everyone – available to adults and thus is a strict no for the pre teens.
But the fact that 17+ rating come after many pornographic clips were posted to the Vine – with new update, you can also report or block the person who posted it – or share yours or their videos to Twitter and Facebook it you loved it.

1) Now it requires users to confirm that they are 17 or older
2) When you open the application, a pop up will ask you to confirm your age.
3) Go to users profile page, tap the “…” button on the top right and a pop-up will give you the option to block (or share) the profile.
4) To report a specific video, tap the “…” button on that video and tap “Report this post.”

However, there is no inbuilt system to detect your real age. It’s the hottest thing in social media right now, but can Vine win this fight. So how do we know?

Based on Justin Wilson (Digital Marketing consultant) analysis on Vine, dubbed the “Instagram of video”: “It seems to me that Vine was launched a little quickly.  It has been criticised for being a little buggy, and is not even available on Android, the world’s number one mobile platform – its an iPhone and iPod Touch only app.  But the growth of video and the fact that they are only short videos mean that they are a very quick and easy way to be entertained.

In terms of commercial use, brands will soon work out ways of communicating their messages succinctly, and will see it as an opportunity to go viral (although I hate that phrase!!).”

Amid the swirl of buzz, the question remains, does the video-sharing app, Vine, live up to the hype?

Here is a short list of few Fashion Brands and Editors to Follow on the New Vine App:

1. Lucky magazine (@LuckyMagazine)
2. Calvin Klein (@CalvinKlein)
3. Man Repeller (@manrepeller)
4. Kirna Zabete  (@KirnaZabete)
5. Fashionista (@Fashionista_com)
6. Lauren Sherman (@Lapresmidi)
7. MTV Style (@MTVStyle)
8. Marc Jacobs Intl (@MarcJacobsIntl)
9. Oscar PR Girl (@OscarPRGirl)
10. Stephan Caras (StephanCaras)

twitter-Vine
Elizabeth Holmes, style reporter for The Wall Street Journal, and Stella Bugbee, editorial director of The Cut and New York Magazine, are using the app:

Here, designer Christian Siriano shows model castings in progress:

Follow me

Steve Gavriliuc

SENIOR EDITOR at CEOWORLD Magazine
A longtime internet addict and casual writer, recognized expert in Infrastructure, Web Operations, and Technology. Organizes, manages and leads the day-to-day operation of the Information Center by reinforcing the mission and providing compellingcontent.(sgavriliuc@ceoworld.biz)
Follow me
About the Author

A longtime internet addict and casual writer, recognized expert in Infrastructure, Web Operations, and Technology. Organizes, manages and leads the day-to-day operation of the Information Center by reinforcing the mission and providing compelling content.(sgavriliuc@ceoworld.biz)

Email: sgavriliuc@ceoworld.biz