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The 20 worst cities in the United States to live in, 2017

The 20 worst cities in the United States to live in, 2017

Detroit was ranked America’s worst city to live in, according to the wizards at 24/7 Wall St, the digital financial news and opinion company. Detroit ranked No. 1 among the 20 worst U.S. cities to live in.

The survey cited Detroit’s poverty rate (39.8 percent of the city’s population lives below the poverty line) among the reasons for the rankings. Birmingham (Alabama) came in at No. 2, followed by Flint (Michigan), St. Louis (Missouri), and Memphis (Tennessee).

Milwaukee (Wisconsin), Albany (Georgia), Hartford (Connecticut), Merced (California), and Wilmington (Delaware) rounded out the ten worst.

The 20 worst cities in the United States to live in, 2017:

  1. Detroit, Michigan
    Population: 677,124
    Median home value: $42,600
    Poverty rate: 39.8%
    Pct. with at least a bachelor’s degree: 14.2%
  2. Birmingham, Alabama
    Population: 214,911
    Median home value: $93,000
    Poverty rate: 29.2%
    Pct. with at least a bachelor’s degree: 25.3%
  3. Flint, Michigan
    Population: 98,297
    Median home value: $25,900
    Poverty rate: 40.8%
    Pct. with at least a bachelor’s degree: 11.8%
  4. St. Louis, Missouri
    Population: 315,685
    Median home value: $130,800
    Poverty rate: 24.9%
    Pct. with at least a bachelor’s degree: 34.7%
  5. Memphis, Tennessee
    Population: 655,760
    Median home value: $94,400
    Poverty rate: 26.2%
    Pct. with at least a bachelor’s degree: 24.9%
  6. Milwaukee, Wisconsin
    Population: 600,154
    Median home value: $114,000
    Poverty rate: 26.8%
    Pct. with at least a bachelor’s degree: 23.9%
  7. Albany, Georgia
    Population: 71,109
    Median home value: $92,600
    Poverty rate: 32.0%
    Pct. with at least a bachelor’s degree: 19.0%
  8. Hartford, Connecticut
    Population: 124,014
    Median home value: $159,200
    Poverty rate: 28.3%
    Pct. with at least a bachelor’s degree: 16.9%
  9. Merced, California
    Population: 82,440
    Median home value: $204,400
    Poverty rate: 35.1%
    Pct. with at least a bachelor’s degree: 19.5%
  10. Wilmington, Delaware
    Population: 71,957
    Median home value: $160,300
    Poverty rate: 26.0%
    Pct. with at least a bachelor’s degree: 25.4%
  11. San Bernardino, California
    Population: 216,137
    Median home value: $201,300
    Poverty rate: 32.6%
    Pct. with at least a bachelor’s degree: 12.2%
  12. Springfield, Missouri
    Population: 166,798
    Median home value: $113,500
    Poverty rate: 24.1%
    Pct. with at least a bachelor’s degree: 28.0%
  13. Stockton, California
    Population: 305,650
    Median home value: $224,300
    Poverty rate: 21.8%
    Pct. with at least a bachelor’s degree: 17.8%
  14. Baltimore, Maryland
    Population: 621,849
    Median home value: $155,600
    Poverty rate: 22.9%
    Pct. with at least a bachelor’s degree: 29.9%
  15. Jackson, Mississippi
    Population: 170,811
    Median home value: $92,600
    Poverty rate: 31.7%
    Pct. with at least a bachelor’s degree: 26.9%
  16. Rockford, Illinois
    Population: 149,346
    Median home value: $87,200
    Poverty rate: 22.4%
    Pct. with at least a bachelor’s degree: 20.9%
  17. Miami Beach, Florida
    Population: 92,311
    Median home value: $460,000
    Poverty rate: 15.1%
    Pct. with at least a bachelor’s degree: 48.1%
  18. Springfield, Massachusetts
    Population: 154,336
    Median home value: $146,700
    Poverty rate: 27.3%
    Pct. with at least a bachelor’s degree: 17.5%
  19. Pueblo, Colorado
    Population: 109,419
    Median home value: $124,700
    Poverty rate: 25.1%
    Pct. with at least a bachelor’s degree: 18.4%
  20. Canton, Ohio
    Population: 71,895
    Median home value: $62,700
    Poverty rate: 31.6%
    Pct. with at least a bachelor’s degree: 14.4%

The rankings were determined by reviewing data on the 551 U.S. cities with a population of 65,000 or more as measured by the U.S. Census Bureau. Crime rates, employment growth, access to restaurants and attractions, educational attainment and housing affordability were among the variables taken into consideration for the survey.

Editor, Todd Aitken
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Deputy Managing Editor at CEOWORLD Magazine
Todd is the deputy managing editor of the CEOWORLD magazine. He is a veteran business and tech blogger, journalist, and analyst. He is responsible for overseeing newsroom assignments and publishing, and providing support to the editor in chief.
Editor, Todd Aitken
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